Kale, © Fotolia
© Fotolia

Regional specialities


You simply cannot fail to be impressed by the taste and flavours of traditional Lower Saxony food. In autumn and winter, curly-leaf kale is one of the best-known dishes from the Lower

Saxony region. Oldenburg is the bastion of Lower Saxony kale growing, a vegetable interestingly known as “brown cabbage” in the Braunschweig region. Depending on the region, kale can either be served with Pinkel smoked Kaszanka sausage or Bregenwurst pork sausage.

Traditional Lower Saxony dishes are as varied as the Lower Saxony landscape itself. However, one thing is common to all: they have all shaped the Lower Saxony food and drink culture, contribute to the identity of the region and often have an importance that goes beyond the borders of the state. Some areas have even developed regional brands to identify their produce. One example of this is the “Typisch Harz” (Typically Harz) label, which denotes the unique quality of produce genuinely produced in the Harz region.

Whether Lüneburger Heide potatoes, asparagus, apples and cherries from the Altes Land region, East Frisian tea, Braunschweig Mumme beer, Heidschnucke mutton or game - the taste of Lower Saxony produce is guaranteed to win you over. Other traditional products include Wendland “Wedding” soup and Altland apple brandy. The East Frisian man’s tea is the native Emslander’s schnapps. Fruit schnapps and corn schnapps are as traditional in Lower Saxony as genuine East Frisian tea with Kluntje (sugar) and Wölkje (milk). The Lüneburger Heide region is also known for its unmistakeable potato schnapps.

And not forgetting fresh North Sea fish, and naturally also North Sea crab. What else do Lower Saxony’s regions have to offer? Buckwheat, for example, a traditional grain that grew very well in the past on the barren moor and heathland. Delicious buckwheat pancakes and buckwheat cake are two products that have their roots in the Lower Saxony region.

The town of Oldenburg is the bastion of Lower Saxony kale growing, served with Pinkel smoked Kaszanka sausage or Bregenwurst pork sausage, depending on the region. And the Braunschweig regional name for kale also translates as “brown cabbage” – could it maybe be because of the “brown” in the name of the town?

Eel, © Fotolia
© Fotolia

Eel

French toast with blueberries, © Fotolia - MARK STOUT
© Fotolia - MARK STOUT

Arme Ritter (French Toast)

buckwheat crepe with salmon and cream, © M.studio - Fotolia
© M.studio - Fotolia

Buckwheat Pancakes

Kale served with Pinkel and Bregenwurst sausages, © Fotolia - Dzinnik Darius
© Fotolia - Dzinnik Darius

Kale Served with Pinkel and Bregenwurst Sausages

Shrimp roll, © Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH / www.ostfriesland.de
© Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH / www.ostfriesland.de

Shrimp Rolls

fresh lentil stew, © Fotolia / Corinna Gissemann
© Fotolia / Corinna Gissemann

Lentil Stew

Tea Ceremony, © Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH / www.ostfriesland.de
© Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH / www.ostfriesland.de

East Frisian Tea

Asparagus, © Mittelweser-Touristik GmbH
© Mittelweser-Touristik GmbH

Asparagus

Welf pudding, © Foto / kitchenkiss
© Foto / kitchenkiss

Welf Pudding

Wendland “Wedding” soup, © kab-vision - Fotolia
© kab-vision - Fotolia

Wendland “Wedding” Soup