Kale, © Fotolia
© Fotolia

Regional specialities

Traditional Lower Saxony dishes are as varied as the Lower Saxony landscape itself. However, one thing is common to all: they have all shaped the Lower Saxony food and drink culture, contribute to the identity of the region and often have an importance that goes beyond the borders of the state. Some areas have even developed regional brands to identify their produce. One example of this is the “Typisch Harz” (Typically Harz) label, which denotes the unique quality of produce genuinely produced in the Harz region.

Whether Lüneburger Heide potatoes, asparagus, apples and cherries from the Altes Land region, East Frisian tea, Braunschweig Mumme beer, Heidschnucke mutton or game - the taste of Lower Saxony produce is guaranteed to win you over. Other traditional products include Wendland “Wedding” soup and Altland apple brandy. The East Frisian man’s tea is the native Emslander’s schnapps. Fruit schnapps and corn schnapps are as traditional in Lower Saxony as genuine East Frisian tea with Kluntje (sugar) and Wölkje (milk). The Lüneburger Heide region is also known for its unmistakeable potato schnapps.

And not forgetting fresh North Sea fish, and naturally also North Sea crab. What else do Lower Saxony’s regions have to offer? Buckwheat, for example, a traditional grain that grew very well in the past on the barren moor and heathland. Delicious buckwheat pancakes and buckwheat cake are two products that have their roots in the Lower Saxony region.

The town of Oldenburg is the bastion of Lower Saxony kale growing, served with Pinkel smoked Kaszanka sausage or Bregenwurst pork sausage, depending on the region. And the Braunschweig regional name for kale also translates as “brown cabbage” – could it maybe be because of the “brown” in the name of the town?

Eel, © Fotolia
© Fotolia


This fish, with its snake-like body, is a delicacy in Lower Saxony that is often served in the district of Ammerland in particular. Sailors used to eat the healthy fish back in the day in preparation for long voyages. Very fatty, yet soft and delicate, the flesh tastes delicious when served with a creamy sauce and garnished with dill.

Apple Tree, © Tourismusverband LK Stade/Elbe e.V. / Martin Elsen
© Tourismusverband LK Stade/Elbe e.V. / Martin Elsen

Apple Soup

Apple soup? It’s likely that you’ve never heard of this speciality from the Altes Land. But did you know that this region located on the banks of the Elbe river is the largest concentrated fruit-growing region in Northern Europe? The traditional soup is made from plenty of cooked apples and raisins and seasoned with a generous helping of cinnamon and vanilla, making it a deliciously sweet treat!

French toast with blueberries, © Fotolia - MARK STOUT
© Fotolia - MARK STOUT

Arme Ritter (French Toast)

“Arme Ritter” (French toast) is a typical and extremely popular dish from Lower Saxony. It’s the perfect snack for hungry tummies as it’s so easy to whip up. All you need to do is soak some slices of stale bread in milk and fry them in a pan with some egg, making sure the bread is coated with it. We recommend serving the toast up with sweet fruit.

buckwheat crepe with salmon and cream, © M.studio - Fotolia
© M.studio - Fotolia

Buckwheat Pancakes

Buckwheat pancakes are a firm favourite in the district of Emsland. Guests can tuck into these tasty treats at “Papenbörger Hus”, an old farming and captain’s house. The pancakes are a much heartier version of crêpes, often being served with treacle and cranberries or alternatively as a savoury dish with salmon and salad. And don’t forget a cup of East Frisian tea.

Kale served with Pinkel and Bregenwurst sausages, © Fotolia - Dzinnik Darius
© Fotolia - Dzinnik Darius

Kale Served with Pinkel and Bregenwurst Sausages

Kale can be harvested after the first frost and is traditionally served with potatoes, smoked pork and Bregenwurst sausages. The city of Oldenburg is famous for producing delicious kale, which is also known as “brown cabbage”. Kale may be given different names in different regions, but there is no denying that it is one of the tastiest delicacies to come out of Lower Saxony.

Shrimp roll, © Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH / www.ostfriesland.de
© Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH / www.ostfriesland.de

Shrimp Rolls

On the North Sea coast in Lower Saxony, you can get your hands on shrimp fresh out of the sea. You'll come across little stalls and carts selling shrimps as you stroll along the promenades in the region’s coastal towns. These tiny delicacies are typically served in a roll with tartar sauce. You may also find fresh North Sea shrimps served up in a wonderfully tasty little salad.

fresh lentil stew, © Fotolia / Corinna Gissemann
© Fotolia / Corinna Gissemann

Lentil Stew

A hearty lentil stew is the perfect dish to enjoy in autumn and winter, as a delicious, hearty meal to give you a warm feeling in your tummy during the colder months of year. This stew is a staple on the farms of Lower Saxony in particular. The lentils and vegetables are sources of plenty of important vitamins and nutrients, whilst the sausages and bacon bulk the soup out, giving it plenty of substance to keep you nice and full.

Tea Ceremony, © Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH / www.ostfriesland.de
© Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH / www.ostfriesland.de

East Frisian Tea

Serving East Frisian tea is a long-standing tradition – particularly in the north of the state. Even far back in history, families would come together to drink tea and spend some quality time in each other’s company. And you can still enjoy this tradition today in countless tearooms across Lower Saxony. The aromatic drink is served up with rock candy, making for the perfect warming treat to enjoy on a cold and rainy day.

asparagus with grilled salmon, © © HLPhoto - stock.adobe.com
© © HLPhoto - stock.adobe.com


Home-grown asparagus is a popular choice in Lower Saxony. The regional produce is eaten between the middle of April and the end of June. Traditionally, asparagus is served with schnitzel and home-grown potatoes, with brown butter and Hollandaise sauce as the perfect finishing touches. The water used to cook the vegetables can be turned into a cream of asparagus soup and served as a delicious starter.

Welf pudding, © Foto / kitchenkiss
© Foto / kitchenkiss

Welf Pudding

Welf pudding is a tasty dessert traditionally served in Lower Saxony. Originating from Hannover, this sweet dish has two layers – a white creamy layer made from milk and vanilla and a yellow creamy wine sauce. Once the favourite pudding of Elector Ernst August, the colours represent the colours of the noble family of the Royal House of Hanover.

Wendland “Wedding” soup, © kab-vision - Fotolia
© kab-vision - Fotolia

Wendland “Wedding” Soup

If you are attending a wedding or any other celebratory feast in Lower Saxony, you can be sure that Wendland “Wedding” soup will be served up as the starter. The original recipe features little dumplings made of minced pork, asparagus and eggs. Fresh parsley is used to season the soup, creating the perfect combination of flavours.