Harburger Elbbrücke, © Touristikverband Landkreis Rotenburg zwischen Heide und Nordsee e.V.
© Touristikverband Landkreis Rotenburg zwischen Heide und Nordsee e.V.

Radfernweg Hamburg Bremen

Distance
315 km
This Tour is suitable for
Touring bike
Type of tour
Distance
Suitable for
Children

The Radfernweg Hamburg-Bremen (Hamburg-Bremen Long-Distance Cycle Path) connects northern Germany’s most famous Hanseatic cities: Hamburg and Bremen. It leads cyclists through a typically northern German landscape of river plains, gently rolling coastal sandy heathland and sprawling forests. Idyllic spots along the route make you want to take a moment to explore.

Route and Sights

The long-distance cycle path starts at Bremen Central Station and heads through the municipal park, passes the Universum Science Center, goes through the city’s Blockland district and the Wümmeniederung (Wümme Depression) to the art colony of Fischerhude. Cyclists pass the tiny towns of Buchholz, Wilstedt and Vorwerk, and ride to Nartum, where writer Walter Kempowski, who died in 2007, lived in the Haus Kreienhoop building. The Melkhus, a milk service station which is open from May to October, and the small motor-driven mill in the town centre are perfect for a stopover.

Visitors can then explore Zeven city centre with its works of art, abbey and other museums. Cyclists ride along the Oste river plain to Sittensen, where the watermill and millpond look picture-perfect. They then pass the Jagdschloss hunting lodge in Burgsittensen and reach the Tister Bauernmoor Nature Reserve and Bird Sanctuary – a perfect place to stop and explore!

After swamps and agricultural land, cyclists head through Heidenau’s historic town centre and pedal along Napoleon’s old military road to Büntberg. After successfully navigating the cobblestones (for approximately 400 m), cyclists are rewarded with unimpeded views across Dohrener Heide, before the long-distance cycle path heads to Hollenstedt, where late boxing legend Max Schmeling used to live.

The “alpine” section of the long-distance cycle path starts just outside Hamburg in Staatsforst Rosengarten (Rosengarten State Forest) and is so called due to the many inclines. Cyclists reach the highest point of the route, at 133 m above sea level, just outside Sieversen. We recommend visiting the open-air museum on the Kiekeberg hill or the Wildpark Schwarze Berge zoo, before heading to the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, cycling through the Old Town and crossing the Alte Harburger Elbbrücke bridge. Here, visitors get an idea of why Hamburg is nicknamed “Venice of the North”. The route leads across the Elbe river, crossing through several districts on the way to the city centre and the final destination of Hamburg Central Station. Cyclists can either end their tour here or explore the city.

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Logo Radfernweg Hamburg Bremen

Signage

The Tour is continuously signposted with this standardised logo

Insider-Tip

The art colony of Fischerhude: high oak trees line the cobblestone streets, and old wooden bridges and jetties span the arms of the Wümme river. Few visitors can escape the charm of this idyllic and pristine place. This was certainly the case for landscape painter Otto Modersohn, who decided to make it his home.

Information


The specifics of the tour

Tister Bauernmoor: migrating cranes rest here, making the nature reserve one of the most important sites for cranes in the north-west German inland. It is also a breeding ground and habitat for 43 bird species and a place for other migratory birds to rest. Visitors are rewarded with amazing views of the moor from the 6.5 m moor tower and the wheelchair-accessible viewing platform. Both of these sites can be reached on foot from the moor train and are open on Sundays and bank holidays. Home-made cakes are also sold in the Haus der Natur café on Sundays and bank holidays from 2 pm.

your contact

Arbeitsgemeinschaft Radfernweg Hamburg – Bremen c/o Touristikverband Landkreis Rotenburg (Wümme) e.V

Harburger Str. 59
27356 Rotenburg (Wümme)
Phone: +49 (0) 4261 / 81960

E-Mail